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to justice. [ cheers and applause ] >> heather: an amazing moment. jim gray is a sportscaster and fox news contributor. jim, what is it about a sporting event that can bring us altogether and allow us all to heal just a little bit, maybe for the moment? >> it's always been an escape. it's a chance to set aside all the problems that go on. it brings the community together. it allows everyone to have a place where they can vent their emotions and try and get away from the realities of life. it's been a great healing in many times of crisis throughout our country's history. >> heather: you've been a sportcast terrify for many years. this was done following 9/11. in the days that followed that, liza minelli and belting out new york, new york. that was september 21st. shoe share some of your reflections and times you remember events have been able to, country has been able to heal due to a sporting event? >> i don't think when president bush took the mound at yankee stadium and he threw out the first pitch. the whole thing had just been a month. it was still so very, very fresh. here the leader
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
writing. he has been questioned since yesterday. cnn international security analyst jim walsh is joining us with more on what's going on. one of the key questions, the weapons that they have, the weapons that eventually killed an m.i.t. police officer, seriously injured another local law enforcement officer. do we have any idea where they got those weapons? >> not yet. and i think that question also extends to the explosives, as well. but this is an investigation pursuing lots of lines of inquiry both foreign and domestic. i would have to guess, though, that rather than risk acquiring weapons and explosives from abroad, it's much more likely they were acquired domestically. >> these two guys apparently didn't have much money, but enough to buy explosives, pressure cookers, a rifle, long rifle according to the watertown police chief i spoke with. other weapons, as well. >> i'm sure they're already well into the suspect's computer files and financial records. we're getting a mixed picture because on the one hand, they seem to have had a modest style of living. on the other hand, there is t
this morning with more rain sadly in the forecast. i feel terrible saying that. cnn's jim spellman is in one of those towns. he's in peoria, illinois. jim, people there are looking at water levels, i understand, that haven't been this high in more than 60 years. >> since the 1940s since the illinois river here in peoria came up this high. but it's not just peoria. rivers across the midwest are flooding. from north dakota to indiana to mississippi, flood watches and warnings throughout the middle of the country, as rainwater from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the risele illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move ba
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